Proclaim Peace: The Restoration’s Answer to an Age of Conflict

Proclaim Peace is an extended meditation on what it means to follow the Prince of Peace in a world of violence. The book seeks not to promote any particular ideology, but rather to invite readers, especially the rising generation, to reflect seriously on the interpersonal, ethical, and social dimensions of Christian discipleship. As such, it represents a spiritual journey by two believing scholars of peace—a journey of scriptural exegesis and hermeneutics that breathe new life into familiar and beloved Restoration texts.

The Restoration encompasses a rich, if somewhat underappreciated, theology of peace. The heart of that theology is captured in a few core ideas: All humans are inherently divine and eternally interrelated. Enduring power can only be achieved through persuasion and love. Conflict is built into creation and can be constructively transformed for godly purposes. In rare instances violence may be justified, but only nonviolence based in love is truly efficacious and sanctifying. And the beloved community of Zion is not simply a utopian ideal but rather an achievable goal if individuals and societies embrace principles of love, equality, justice, and peace as exemplified by Jesus Christ.

In a world plagued by “wars and rumors of wars,” it is easy to be resigned to violence, to see it as an inescapable part of the human condition. But we believe, with President Russell M. Nelson, that “peace is possible” in this world and that the “descendants of Abraham . . . are in a pivotal position to emerge as peacemakers.”  This book is an effort to lift up the Restoration’s distinctive principles that invite its followers, and others as well, to renounce violence and proclaim Christ’s good news of love and peace to a world that desperately needs it.

As someone who grew up within the faith, I am always delighted when scholars help me see even more clearly the power of the restored gospel to effect loving peace, both in the individual soul and in societies on a grander scale.

Endorsements

“Proclaim Peace is an important, desperately needed book. In a world filled with so much tumultuous conflict, this book is deeply relevant to the personal and socio-political issues we face as Latter-Day Saints. I have especially seen an explosion of interest from young Latter-Day Saints in peacebuilding here at BYUH. This generation of Latter-Day Saints is the most socially conscious we’ve ever had. They want more than personal peace from the gospel. They want to be able to use the gospel to make the world a better place. Not only does the book do an excellent job of walking the reader through both historical and doctrinal aspects of peacebuilding, it builds a blueprint of how peacebuilding can be part of our living faith.”

Chad Ford

“Proclaim Peace provides readers an intelligent, faith-promoting perspective on how peace is central to the Gospel, and how the Book of Mormon can be read to think more critically about the justification of violence and the necessity of pursuing peace. Compared to many other faith traditions, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is very new to exploring an ethics of war and peace, and this book provides Latter-day Saint young adults some important tools for looking at their religion’s scripture and doctrine more deeply and understanding war and peace more fully. There is a massive void when it comes to Latter-day Saint voices in peacebuilding, so this work represents a huge, important contribution.”

Benjamin Cook

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Publication Information

  • Publication Date: October 4
  • ISBN 13: 978-1950304165
  • Page Count: 288
  • Format: Hardcover, Paperback, eBook
  • Price: $ 19.95
  • Imprint: Neal A. Maxwell Institute for Religious Scholarship

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The views expressed here and in Maxwell Institute publications are those of the individual authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the Maxwell Institute, Brigham Young University, or The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

“Seek ye diligently and teach one another words of wisdom; yea, seek ye out of the best books words of wisdom; seek learning, even by study and also by faith.” (D&C 88:118)